Implanted Occipital Nerve Stimulators

Chronic headache represents a very significant public health and economic issue. One treatment modality for chronic refractory headache involves the use of subcutaneous implanted neurostimulator leads in the occipital region. Varied types of headache etiologies including migraine, transformed migraine, chronic daily headache, cluster headache, hemicrania continua, occipital neuralgia, and cervicogenic headache have been studied with peripheral nerve field stimulation and found responsive to stimulation of the suboccipital region, known commonly as occipital nerve stimulation (ONS).

Cluster Headache Review

Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year.

Medication-overuse headache in patients with cluster headache

Cluster headache (CH) is associated with the most severe pain of the primary headache disorders. Barriers to optimal care include misdiagnosis, diagnostic delay, undertreatment, and mismanagement. Medication-over-use headache (MOH) may further complicate CH and may present as increased CH frequency or development of a background headache, which may be featureless or have some migrainous quality.

SUNCT and SUNA: clinical features and medical treatment

SUNCT and SUNA are not rare conditions. Characterisation into episodic and chronic disease course appears to be of prognostic and therapeutic importance. Lamotrigine is effective in the majority of cases and subcutaneous lignocaine is useful as acute treatment for severe recalcitrant attacks.

Trigemino-Cervical Reflex Abnormalities in Patients With Migraine and Cluster Headache

Head pain arises within the trigeminal nociceptive system. Current theories propose that the trigeminal system is intimately involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. Short-latency responses can be recorded in sternocleidomastoid muscles after stimulation of the trigeminal nerve (trigemino-cervical reflex). This brainstem reflex could be a suitable method to evaluate the trigeminal system in migraine and CH.