Anti-CGRP antibodies: a new approach to migraine prevention

In The Lancet Neurology, David Dodick and colleagues1 introduce monoclonal antibodies into the specialty of primary headache therapy. They report findings from a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase 2 clinical trial of LY2951742, a neutralising humanised monoclonal antibody against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), for migraine prevention. The subcutaneous administration of LY2951742 once every 2 weeks reduced the mean number of migraine headache days per 28-day period between baseline and weeks 9–12 (primary endpoint; least-squares mean difference −1·2, 90% CI −1·9 to −0·6; p=0·0030) in a population with a high frequency of migraine; the antibody was also superior to placebo in several secondary endpoints after 12 weeks of treatment.

Safety and efficacy of LY2951742, a monoclonal antibody to calcitonin gene-related peptide, for the prevention of migraine: a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

These results provide preliminary evidence that LY2951742 might be beneficial in migraine prevention and provide support for the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the pathogenesis of migraine. Further controlled studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of monoclonal calcitonin gene-related peptide antibodies for the preventive treatment of migraine.

Anti-CGRP antibodies for migraine turn industry heads

In June, Teva of Petach Tikva, Israel, paid $200 million in cash and $625 million in future milestones to acquire Labrys Biologics of San Mateo, California. The Israeli drug maker wanted to get its hands on LBR-101, the biotech’s preventive treatment for migraines and its only asset. LBR-101, a humanized monoclonal a…