High sensitivity C-reactive protein and cerebral white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging in migraine patients

Migraine is a common headache disorder that may be associated with vascular disease and cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a marker of inflammation that may predict subclinical atherosclerosis. However, the relation between migraine, vascular risks, and WMHs is unknown. We evaluated hs-CRP levels and the relation between hs-CRP level and WMHs in adult migraine patients.

Site of effect of LY2951742 for migraine prophylaxis

In The Lancet Neurology, David Dodick and colleagues1 report an important study of treatment in migraine prophylaxis: parenteral administration of LY2951742, a monoclonal antibody to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Mean decrease from baseline in migraine days in 4 weeks was higher in patients given LY2951742 (4·2) than in those given placebo (3·0; p=0·003).1 Results of other trials that use antibodies against CGRP will probably be published soon.

Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP): A New Target for Migraine

Migraine is a neurological disorder that manifests as a debilitating headache associated with altered sensory perception. The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is now firmly established as a key player in migraine. Clinical trials carried out during the past decade have proved that CGRP receptor antagonists are effective for treating migraine, and antibodies to the receptor and CGRP are currently under investigation. Despite this progress in the clinical arena, the mechanisms by which CGRP triggers migraine remain uncertain.