The 'headache tree' via umbellulone and TRPA1 activates the trigeminovascular system

The California bay laurel or Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt., is known as the ‘headache tree’ because the inhalation of its vapours can cause severe headache crises. However, the underlying mechanism of the headache precipitating properties of Umbellularia californica is unknown. The monoterpene ketone umbellulone, the major volatile constituent of the leaves of Umbellularia californica, has irritating properties, and is a reactive molecule that rapidly binds thiols.

Trigeminal TRPs and the Scent of Pain

The neurological mechanisms leading to headache pain are complex and poorly understood. Genetic studies of familial migraine conditions have provided important insights into the potential physiological causes underlying headache conditions.

Global Incidence and Prevalence of Cluster Headache

We present a study of the general-population prevalence of cluster headache in the Republic of Georgia and discuss the advantages and challenges of different methodological approaches. In a community-based survey, specially trained medical residents visited 500 adjacent households in the capital city, Tbilisi, and 300 households in the eastern rural area of Kakheti.

Post-Traumatic Cluster Headache: From the Periphery to the Central Nervous System?

A correlation between head trauma and cluster headache is believed to exist. We report a case of post-traumatic episodic cluster headache that fulfills the criteria of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. The distinctive features of this case are: a close temporal relation between head trauma and headache onset; pain ipsilateral to the side of trauma; mild severity of trauma; episodic course well-responsive to low doses of verapamil

Roles of transient receptor potential channels in pain

Pain perception begins with the activation of primary sensory nociceptors. Over the past decade, flourishing research has revealed that members of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel family are fundamental molecules that detect noxious stimuli and transduce a diverse range of physical and chemical energy into action potentials in somatosensory nociceptors. Here we highlight the roles of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) and TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in the activation of nociceptors by heat and cold environmental stimuli, mechanical force, and by chemicals including exogenous plant and environmental compounds as well as endogenous inflammatory molecules.

Functional magnetic resonance imaging in episodic cluster headache

We have investigated the cerebral activation centre in four patients with episodic cluster headache (CH) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI). The patients underwent MRI scans for anatomical and functional data acquisition in the asymptomatic state, during a headache attack and after subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan. Anatomical images were acquired by means of 3D-MPRAGE sequences and f-MRI images were obtained by means of echo-planar imaging.

Trigemino-Cervical Reflex Abnormalities in Patients With Migraine and Cluster Headache

Head pain arises within the trigeminal nociceptive system. Current theories propose that the trigeminal system is intimately involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. Short-latency responses can be recorded in sternocleidomastoid muscles after stimulation of the trigeminal nerve (trigemino-cervical reflex). This brainstem reflex could be a suitable method to evaluate the trigeminal system in migraine and CH.

Characterization of SB-705498, a potent and selective vanilloid receptor-1 (VR1/TRPV1) antagonist that inhibits the capsaicin-, acid-, and heat-mediated activation of the receptor

Vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel,
predominantly expressed by sensory neurons, which plays a
key role in the detection of noxious painful stimuli such as
capsaicin, acid, and heat. TRPV1 antagonists may represent
novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of a range of conditions
including chronic pain, migraine, and gastrointestinal
disorders.

Practical strategy for detecting and relieving cluster headaches

You interview a “migraine” sufferer who hopes to find the relief that has so far eluded him. During the history taking, he reports experiencing the premonitory aura typical of migraine as well as photophobia and occasionally nausea. One description, though, raises a question about the cause of his headaches: he says the intense pain recurs at roughly the same time of day and lasts for about 45 minutes; he is unable to concentrate on anything but the pain and he paces ceaselessly until it abates. The odds now favor a diagnosis of cluster headache.