Researchers Find Evidence Explaining Why Headaches are More Severe Than Body Pain

A recent study, using laboratory mice, discovered a physical link within the brain that may explain why headaches are more severe than pain we experience in other parts of the body. Pain perception involves both the physical sensation of pain and the emotional response to that pain. There are physical structures within the brain that regulate both, but until now, a direct link between the two had only been hypothesized.

Cerebral hemodynamics in the different phases of migraine and cluster headache

Headache is one of the most common ailments; migraine is one of the most prevalent and disabling neurological disorders and cluster headache presents as one of the most excruciating pain disorders. Both are complex disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of headache. A key feature is that various triggers can set off an attack providing the opportunity to explore disease mechanisms by experimentally inducing attacks. This review summarizes neuroimaging and hemodynamic studies in human in provoked and spontaneous attacks of migraine and cluster headache.

Cluster and Facial Headache

Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are primary headache disorders characterized by unilateral head pain of varying duration associated with ipsilateral cranial autonomic features.

The pathophysiology of episodic cluster headache: Insights from recent neuroimaging research

Cluster headache is a disorder characterized by intermittent, severe unilateral head pain accompanied by cranial autonomic symptoms. Most cases of CH are episodic, manifesting as “in-bout” periods of frequent headache separated by month-to-year-long “out-of-bout” periods of remission. Previous imaging studies have implicated the hypothalamus and pain matrix in the pathogenesis of episodic CH. However, the pathophysiology driving the transition between in- and out-of-bout periods remains unclear.

The reappearance of hemiplegic cluster headaches: A case report and review of the literature

Cluster headache (CH) is a rare and severe syndrome characterized by the recurrence of unilateral pain attacks, of short duration (15–180 min), and associated with ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. Although, not formally included in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, hemiplegic cluster headache (HCH) is an even more rare subtype of CH in which typical attacks can be accompanied by visual, sensory, and/or aphasic migrainous auras that have a variable propensity to evolve in reversible hemi-motor symptoms.

Allodynia in Cluster Headache

Cutaneous allodynia is an established marker for central sensitization in migraine. There is debate whether cutaneous allodynia may also occur in cluster headache, another episodic headache disorder. Here, we examined the presence and severity of allodynia in a large well-defined nationwide population of people with cluster headache.

Macro- and microstructural alterations of the subcortical structures in episodic cluster headache

Previous functional and structural imaging studies have revealed that subcortical structures play a key a role in pain processing. The recurring painful episodes might trigger maladaptive plasticity or alternatively degenerative processes that might be detected by MRI as changes in size or microstructure. In the current investigation, we aimed to identify the macro- and microstructural alterations of the subcortical structures in episodic cluster headache.